The birds’ favourite places include the Jerrabomberra Wetlands, sewage reticulation ponds, urban wetlands and wet sclerophyll forests in the ACT. Canada seasonally hosts approximately 450 species of native birds, the majority of which are protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and are collectively referred to as “migratory birds”. The following list presents the families of birds not named in Article I of the Convention, but whose member species occur in Canada (including accidental, exotic, undetermined and extirpated status from Wild Species 2010). Act current to 2020-11-02 and last amended on 2017-12-12. See coming into force provision and notes, where applicable. This section provides answers to most frequently asked questions related to the Migratory Birds Sanctuary Regulations (MBSR). Among others, Environment and Climate Change Canada is responsible for implementing the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, which provides for the protection of migratory birds through the Migratory Birds Regulations and the Migratory Birds Sanctuary Regulations. The MBCA was passed in 1917, and updated in 1994 and 2005, to implement the Migratory Birds Convention, a treaty signed with the United States in 1916. Most species of birds in Canada are protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA). The hunting of migrating game birds is managed through bi-annual process of consultation resulting in the amendments of the Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations and established according to national Objectives and Guidelines. Historically included as allies of the petrels and herons. Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. PDF Full Document: Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 [475 KB] Act current to 2020-11-02 and last amended on 2017-12-12. Environment and Climate Change Canada requires that all three criteria below be met to qualify a species for the list of bird species protected in Canada under the MBCA. Formerly included as a sub-family of the Laridae; although the current family name is not specifically mentioned in Article I, the group of birds it encompasses is listed (i.e., jaegers). Help; Search within this Act: Table of Contents . The following links are provided for convenience, but may not be current. Species known to have regularly occurred in Canada.

Families of birds that are not listed in that Act include grouse, quail, pheasants, ptarmigan, hawks, owls, eagles, falcons, cormorants, pelicans, crows, jays, kingfishers, and some species of blackbirds. Please consult the legislation of the relevant jurisdiction before making any decisions regarding the protected status of a bird species in Canada. Please consult the legislation of the relevant jurisdiction before making any decisions regarding the protected status of a bird species in Canada. Birds in Canada are protected under provincial and territorial statute in addition to the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. These criteria do not represent a reduction in Environment and Climate Change Canada's mandate or the families of birds previously protected under the MBCA: In general, birds not falling under federal jurisdiction within Canada include grouse, quail, pheasants, ptarmigan, hawks, owls, eagles, falcons, cormorants, pelicans, crows, jays, kingfishers, and some species of blackbirds. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - Migratory Bird Sanctuary Regulations (MBSR) Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) and Regulations Canada seasonally hosts approximately 450 species of native birds, the majority of which are protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and are collectively referred to as “migratory birds”. Migratory species listed under international agreements to which Australia is a party are protected under the Australian Government's central piece of environmental legislation, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).. EPBC Act Migratory Species List ; International conventions and agreements Although species that occur infrequently (i.e., “accidentals”) and that meet criteria 1 and 2 are not included on this list, they continue to be considered as having protection under the MBCA any time they occur in Canadian territory.

This table provides information on legislation of other jurisdictions regarding migratory birds in Canada. Persons making any decisions regarding the protected status of a bird species in Canada should consult these other statutes. The list of birds protected under the MBCA follows the American Ornithologists' Union's Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998), and its supplements to 2014, on matters of taxonomy, nomenclature, and sequence. Anatidae, or waterfowl (ducks, geese and swans); Scolopacidae (sandpipers and allies); and. Previous Versions, Full Document: Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, Designation of Regulatory Provisions for Purposes of Enforcement (Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994) Regulations, French Constitutional Drafting Committee (1990), Statutes Repeal Act: Reports, Deferrals and Repeals, Miscellaneous Statute Law Amendment Program, Typographical and Grammatical Corrections, Table of Public Statutes and Responsible Ministers, Consolidated Index of Statutory Instruments. Only some members of the family Icteridae (bobolink, meadowlarks, and orioles) are named in Article I, while the remainder (blackbirds, grackles and cowbirds) are excluded. List of Migratory Birds - Search by Taxonomic Order Birds in Canada are protected under provincial and territorial statute in addition to the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. Two migratory flycatchers breed in the ACT’s mountainous wet sclerophyll forest during spring and summer. You will not receive a reply. Similar legislation in the United States [Birds Protected By The Migratory Bird Treaty Act] protects birds species found in that country, though the list of bird species protected by each country can be different. Until a decision is reached by the concerned parties, these species will remain under MBCA protection. Marginal note:Definitions 1. This section provides answers to most frequently asked questions related to the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA). Formerly included as a sub-family of the Emberizidae; although the current family name is not specifically mentioned in Article I, the generic group of birds it encompasses is listed (i.e., wood-warblers, tanagers, cardinals and grosbeaks and allies, bobolinks, meadowlarks and orioles). Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) “Migratory birds” are defined by Article I of the Convention which names the families and subfamilies of birds protected, and provides some clarification of the species included. 2 (1) In this Act, Canadian vessel 1.1. Formerly included as a sub-family of the Muscicapidae; although the current family name is not specifically mentioned in Article I, the group of birds it encompasses is listed (i.e., kinglets, gnatcatchers, robins and thrushes).